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Crank Dyno / Shock Software Troubleshooting Guide

 

Troubleshooting Guide for MTS-Roehrig Crank Dyno’s 

 

This troubleshooting guide can be used to troubleshoot basic Crank Dyno equipment issues.

 


Contents

1. Restart the Dyno and PC

2. Verify Power to Dyno

3. Data Card - Power, Cable and Software Check

    3.1 Datacard Software - InstaCal

    3.2 Shock6 Board Number Verification and Datacard Selection

4. Motor Cable

    4.1 USB to Serial Converter Troubleshooting

    4.2 Serial (COM) Port Settings in Windows

    4.3 Serial (COM) Port Setting in Shock6

5. Software Key (Dongle)

    5.1 Software Key Drivers

6. Shock6 Software

    6.1 Error Messages

    6.2 Motor, Datacard and Software Key Indicators

    6.3 Possible System States

    6.4 Demo Mode

    6.5 Backing up and Restoring Settings

    6.6 Basic Uninstall and Reinstall Instructions

7. Windows Settings

    7.1 USB Power Management – turn off power saving in device manager

    7.2 Windows Power Options

8. Common Issues


1. Restart the Dyno and PC

Restart the Dyno and the PC by following the procedure:

  1. Close the Shock6 software
  2. Reboot the computer
  3. Turn off power to the dyno (unplug any power cables to the frame or turn off the breaker for the circuit it is connected to)
  4. Wait until the inverter display on the dyno is no longer illuminated to ensure the dyno has been fully powered off
  5. Turn on power to the dyno
  1. Open the Shock6 software once the dyno is fully powered on

Attempt to run a normal test using the Shock6 software to check if the system is functional.

2. Verify Power to Dyno

There may be two power cables on some crank dyno systems, with new systems only using one cable as described below:

  1. A high voltage cable supplying power to the inverter and motor. This cable is large and usually gray or black in color supplying 220-480 VAC power. This is the only cable that newer dyno systems use.
    1. Verify that the circuit breaker is in the on position to supply power to the circuit that the system is connected to. If the circuit is using fuses instead of a circuit breaker, verify with the proper facilities person that the fuses are intact and not blown.
    2. Verify that the crank dyno is plugged into a circuit providing the proper voltage and with the appropriate amperage rating
    3. Look at the inverter keypad display (either on the dyno column or under a lexan window in the body of the dyno as seen in Figure 1) and verify the display and power LED are illuminated and shows 0.0 Hz. This will indicate the inverter is on and receiving the proper supply voltage.

Figure 1: A VF-S15 Inverter display showing 0.0 Hz indicating the inverter has power

  1. A standard household plug which supplies power to the data acquisition hardware on older systems (this cord is not present on newer systems)
    1. Verify that the cord is plugged into a standard household outlet.
    2. Verify that the outlet is supplying voltage reliably. Using a multimeter or a known good device (lamp, drill, vacuum, etc), verify the outlet is functional and providing the proper voltage. If using a power strip, verify that the power strip is on and that the outlet on the power strip is functional.

Attempt to run a normal test using the Shock6 software to check if the system is functional.

3. Data Card - Power, Cable and Software Check

Data is sent from the USB data acquisition device (also called the Datacard) mounted to the dyno frame to the PC over a USB cable. This device must be connected to the PC for the software to record data from any of the sensors (load cell, temperature sensor, displacement sensor, velocity sensor).

  • Verify that the cable is connected to the USB B connector on the dyno frame.
  • Verify that the cable is connected to the USB A connector at the PC.

Figure 2: The datacard connection and status LED

When the USB data acquisition device is properly connected to the PC, the status LED on the datacard will be illuminated or flashing. If the LED is lit or flashing it indicates the device is being powered by the computer and the cable is properly connected at both ends. Flashing indicates that the PC is actively communicating with the datacard such as when data is being recorded.

If the LED is not lit:

  • The cable is not connected properly
    1. Unplug both ends of the cable and plug them back in.
  • The cable is faulty
    1. Swap in a different USB B to USB A cable.
  • The USB port is faulty and is not supplying power to the datacard
    1. Locate a working USB port on the computer by using a known working USB device such as a flash drive. Plug the USB datacard cable into this tested and working USB port.
    2. Plug the device and cable into a known working USB port on another computer to verify the cable and USB datacard are functional, again looking for the LED light to light up or blink.
  • The USB data acquisition device is faulty
    1. If the LED will not light up when plugged into a known good cable on a known good USB port on a known good PC, the USB data acquisition device is faulty and requires replacement

Attempt to run a normal test using the Shock6 software to check if the system is functional.

3.1 Datacard Software - InstaCal

Instacal is the software package used to setup the USB Data acquisition device (Datacard). The USB data acquisition device is identified by the Shock6 software using a board number which should always be 1 for USB-1608 daq devices. The board number can be verified using the Instacal software. The board number configured in the Shock6 software must match the board number set for the datacard by Instacal for Shock6 to recognize the device and record data from it.

To check the board number:

  1. Ensure the Datacard USB cable is connected to the datacard on the crank dyno frame and to the PC and that the status LED on the datacard is either lit or blinking.
  2. Navitage to “C:\Program Files (x86)\Roehrig\Datacards\Instacal 6.XX\” where “XX” may be anywhere between 22 and 72 depending on what version of InstaCal was installed with the software.
  3. Right click on the Inscal.exe (or Inscal32.exe) executable and run it with administrator permissions as seen in Figure 3.

Figure 3: Right click on inscal32.exe (or inscal.exe) and select Run as administrator

  1. (Optional) If prompted by InstaCal to run the HID Registry Update utility (Figure 4), click Yes. This is only applicable to Windows operating systems later than 8.1 such as windows 10 and may not show up if this was tool was run previously. Follow the popup windows to run the update and close the utility after it has completed (Figure 5 through Figure 7). Disconnect and reconnect the USB cable to the datacard for the changes to take effect. Note: the HID Registry Update utility can be launched manually by navigating to the Instacal Install directory (usually within the Shock6 Datacard Instacal directory at C:\Program Files (x86)\Roehrig\Datacards\Instacal\ or if instacal was installed manually it would be located at C:\Program Files (x86)\Measurement Computing\DAQ\) and running the HIDRegUpdater.exe application with administrator permissions.

Figure 4: The HID Registry Update utility prompt which may occur on some windows 10 computers

Figure 5: The update window

Figure 6: A reboot warning window after running the update

Figure 7: The confirmation screen that the registry update was successful

  1. While InstaCal is launching, there may be several popups such as Figure 8. Click OK to remove each board from the configuration that InstaCal says are not connected to the system. Do not worry if these screens do not appear.

Figure 8: The ‘PnP’ Board Detection window (Plug and Play Board Detection) noting that a certain board is not connected to the PC

  1. The Plug and Play Board Detection window may show up which displays all boards InstaCal was able to find currently connected to the system if the configuration has changed substantially. Do not worry if it does not pop up, it won’t always occur. Check the box next to the USB-1608 device and click OK.

  1. Once all popup screens have been acknowledged with “OK”, in the main InstaCal window the PC Board List will appear. It should contain a Universal Serial Bus device labeled something such as Board# 1 - USB-1608FS (see Figure 9). If there are no USB devices, it means that the datacard is not recognized by the computer or the software. Ensure the board is plugged in to a known good USB port and the LED light is on or blinking.

Figure 9: The main InstaCal program screen with the USB-1608FS device highlighted, noting the Board Number for the device is 1

  1. The board number is displayed at the start of the name of the device. In the case of Figure 9, the board number is 1. The board number for the standard new dynos using the USB-1608FS USB DAQ should always be set to 1. Older dynos using a DT datacard should have the board number set to 0.
  2. If the board number is not 1, right click on the USB device and select the Change Board# option (seen in Figure 10).

Figure 10: Right clicking on the USB device shows many menu options including Change Board#

  1. In the “User Board Number” window that pops up (Figure 11), select 1 and click OK.

Figure 11: The board number selection screen

  1. As long as the InstaCal software was run with administrator permissions, the new settings should automatically save before the application is closed as there is no “save” feature in InstaCal.
  2. Close the InstaCal application and reopen it to ensure that the board number of the USB device did change to 1 (if it was not already 1 when first opened) and that the configuration change saved.
  3. Close Instacal.

3.2 Shock6 Board Number Verification and Datacard Selection

The USB datacard board number set in InstaCal (board number 1 for newer systems) must match the board number in Shock6. The following steps walk through verifying and changing the board number in Shock6:

  1. Open Shock6
  2. On the top bar select the Hardware drop down and the Datacard option (Figure 12).

Figure 12: The Hardware dropdown highlighting the Datacard selection

  1. At the popup warning window, select Yes (Figure 13).

Figure 13: The Datacard warning screen

  1. Select the appropriate datacard for the system if it is not already selected. Standard new systems use the “Roehrig PMD-1608 datacard”. Click the Configure button. Selecting the improper datacard will result in the machine not being able to run or take data and can be corrected by selecting the appropriate datacard.

Figure 14: The Datacard selection window

  1. The datacard configuration window that displays (Figure 15) will have a Board dropdown selection which should be set to 1. If it is not set to 1, change it to 1.

Figure 15: The Datacard configuration window with the Board number setting highlighted

  1. While in the datacard configuration screen, verify that Displacement, Force and Velocity channels are enabled and configured as these are mandatory signals. Temperature is optional. Double clicking on each channel name will bring up a calibration table which must be filled out properly for the signals to convert to the proper values within Shock6. If all of these channels have default names (Channel 1 through Channel 8), the system settings file should be imported from a backup of the system as the standard software settings are missing and calibrations are missing as well.
  2. Click Ok through all screens to save the board number change and return to Shock6.
  3. Close Shock6 and reopen it.

Attempt to run a normal test using the Shock6 software to check if the system is functional.

4. Motor Cable

The PC sends serial commands to the motor inverter to control actuator motion. Older systems may have a dedicated serial connection on the PC which connects to the inverter. Newer systems use a USB to serial converter which then connects to the inverter. Ensure that the serial cable running from the inverter on the crank dyno frame is connected to the PC’s serial connection or the USB serial converter.

4.1 USB to Serial Converter Troubleshooting

If the USB to serial converter is properly connected to the PC while the PC is powered on, the power LED on the serial converter will be lit as shown in Figure 16. This indicates that the PC is supplying the proper power to the serial converter.

Figure 16: The USB to serial converter shown in its powered on state

If the power LED on the serial converter is not lit up when the PC is on:

  • The cable is not connected properly to the PC
    1. Verify the USB end of the USB to serial converter is connected to the PC
  • The USB port is faulty and is not supplying power to the serial converter
    1. Locate a working USB port on the computer by using a known working USB device such as a flash drive. Plug the USB end of the serial converter into this tested and working USB port.
    2. Plug the serial converter into a known working USB port on another computer to verify the serial converter cable is functional by watching for the Power LED to light up.
  • The USB to serial converter is faulty
    1. If the power LED will not light up when plugged into a known good USB port on a known good PC, the USB to serial converter is faulty and requires replacement

The next step after verifying proper power to the USB to serial converter is to verify that the correct drivers are installed.

  1. With the USB to serial converter plugged into the PC, open the windows device manager.
  2. Expand the Ports (COM & LPT) section.
  3. An entry should exist with a label such as USB Serial Port (COM X) similar to Figure 17. If this or a similarly named USB Com port does not exist, or there are unidentified USB devices, the drivers for the USB to serial converter may not be properly installed.

Figure 17: An example of how the USB to serial converter may be displayed in the windows device manager

  1. If an unrecognized USB device is present in the device manager, unplug the USB to serial converter from the PC and refresh the device manager (using the Action dropdown, select Scan for Hardware Changes) to see if the unrecognized device goes away. If so, the unrecognized device is the USB serial converter and the device is either malfunctioning or the drivers are incorrect.
  2. Plug the serial converter back in to the PC and locate the unrecognized device in the device manager. Right click on the device and select Update Driver Software and allow the computer to automatically search for drivers. If windows fails to locate drivers, locate the proper drivers for the device from the internet and install them. The XS890 USB serial converter is provided with new crank dyno systems and drivers can be downloaded from the webpage http://www.usconverters.com/usb-rs485-converter-xs890?zenid=a4f56bb1f35ea6cee71ddcd44cfb1d12 (or alternatively by going to usconverters.com and searching for “XS890” and downloading the drivers). If the system is using a different USB serial converter, locate the appropriate drivers and install them.

If there are unused COM ports in the device manager, they can be disabled so that they aren’t accidentally selected within Shock6. Simply right click on the COM port device in the device manager and select Disable.

4.2 Serial (COM) Port Settings in Windows

Once the USB to serial converter is properly powered up (indicated by the power LED being on) and the drivers are properly installed or if the PC is using a dedicated serial connection, the serial port (or COM port) settings must be verified in Windows.

  1. If using the USB to serial converter, plug it in to the PC.
  2. In Windows, navigate to the device manager and expand the Ports (COM & LPT) section.
  3. Locate the USB to serial converter device (if using a USB to serial converter) or the Communication Port device if using a dedicated serial port on the PC (see Figure 18). Only one COM port connection is used to command the inverter. Multiple ports may be available on the PC depending on what other devices it is connected to or what connections the PC has available. The COM port number assigned to the device will be at the end of the device name. The COM port number on the device connecting to the inverter must match the COM port set within the Shock6 software. Make a note of the COM port number.

Figure 18: Device Manager showing examples of a dedicated COM port (COM1) and a USB Serial Port (COM6) supplied by a USB to serial converter

Note: The COM port number assigned to the device by Windows can be changed (Figure 21) by right clicking on the device, selecting Properties (Figure 19) and clicking the Advanced button on the Port Settings tab (Figure 20).

Figure 19: Selecting the properties option of the COM port device in the device manager

Figure 20: The Port Settings tab of the COM port device properties page

Figure 21: The Advanced settings of the COM port device allowing the COM port number to be adjusted

4.3 Serial (COM) Port Setting in Shock6

  1. Open the Shock6 software.
  2. Click the Hardware pull down and select Motor (Figure 22).

Figure 22: The Motor settings selection within the Hardware menu

  1. Click Yes at the warning popup window (Figure 23).

Figure 23: The Shock6 Motor warning popup window

  1. Select the appropriate motor configuration for the system in the motor configuration window (Figure 24). Older systems use the G2-G9 motor configurations while new systems use the VF-S9 and VF-S15 motor configurations. These correspond to the model of Toshiba inverter installed on the system.

Figure 24: The motor configuration selection window

  1. Click Configure.
  2. In the Motor Properties window (Figure 25), verify that the Com Port number is set as the same number that was previously located in the device manager. After changing the Com Port to the appropriate port number, press Ok through several windows to save the new com port setting. Do not change other motor properties unless you have an advanced understanding of the system and its settings.

Figure 25: The motor properties window noting the location of the Com Port number that Shock6 uses to communicate with the inverter

  1. Close the Shock6 software and reopen it.
  2. Attempt to run a normal test using the Shock6 software to check if the system is functional. If using a USB to serial converter, the separate transmit and receive LED lights on the USB to serial converter will flash at different points during a test, indicating that the PC is sending commands from Shock6 to the inverter, and that the inverter is sending commands back to the PC and Shock6 (see Figure 26). If using a PC with a built-in serial port, this visual clue that the serial connection is active will not be available.

Figure 26: The transmit and receive status LEDs on the USB to serial converter

5. Software Key (Dongle)

Shock6 software is licensed by the use of a physical software key that looks like a green USB flash drive (left and right in Figure 27) that is supplied with the system when purchased. This key must be functioning and plugged into the PC running the Shock6 software in order to operate the crank dyno. Old crank dyno systems may use a printer port key that is white as seen in the middle of Figure 27. This guide will only discuss systems using the green software keys applicable to newer crank dyno systems.

Figure 27: The software key used to license each crank dyno system

If this is a new software installation the key MUST be plugged in when prompted at the beginning of the installation process (Figure 28), as the software key tells the installer what features to install for each machine. If no key was used during installation, the software will install in Demo mode and have no ability to create tests or communicate with a dyno. If the software was installed without a key plugged into the PC, uninstall and reinstall the software, being sure to plug in the software key when prompted by the installation process and do not click the Demo button.

Figure 28: The software key prompt that occurs during installation when no key is plugged in

When the software key is plugged into the PC with the PC powered on, the status LED on the USB drive shown in Figure 27 should be lit. If the status LED is not lit:

  • The software key is not properly plugged in to the PC
    1. Verify the software key is securely plugged in all the way
  • The USB port is faulty and is not supplying power to software key
    1. Locate a working USB port on the computer by using a known working USB device such as a flash drive. Plug the software key into this tested and working USB port.
  • Drivers for the software key are not installed
    1. Follow the instructions in the next section to verify the drivers are installed.
  • The software key is faulty
    1. If the Status LED does not light up after verifying that drivers are properly installed on the PC and testing it in a known good USB port, the software key is faulty and requires replacement. Note that the Status LED will not light up unless the proper drivers are for the software key are installed on the PC.

5.1 Software Key Drivers

The Status LED on the software key will not light up if the proper drivers are not installed on the PC. To verify that drivers are installed:

  1. Plug the software key into a known working USB port on the PC.
  2. Open the device manager.
  3. Expand the Universal Serial Bus Controllers section.
  4. Locate the entries relating to a SafeNet, Sentinel, HASP or Key similar to Figure 29 and Figure 30. The exact naming and number of entries may not be identical to what is shown in the figures as it may vary with the version of the software key.

Figure 29: A representation of how the software key should display in the device manager

Figure 30: A different representation of how the software key may display in the device manager

  1. If no device manager entries appear for the software key, the key may be faulty or the USB port the key is plugged into may be faulty. Test another USB port or try the key in another computer. If the key is faulty, a replacement must be purchased and it must have licenses assigned by MTS.
  2. If there is an unrecognized device that shows up when the software key is plugged in which disappears when the software key is removed from the USB port, the drivers for the software key are not properly installed or the device is malfunctioning. Uninstall and reinstall the Shock6 software with the software key plugged into the computer, as the installer configures the software key drivers during installation.
  3. If the installation will not recognize the software key (plugged into a known good USB port and with an unknown USB device appearing in the windows device manager), the drivers for the software key can be manually installed before the Shock6 software installation. Download the Sentinel HASP/LDK Windows GUI Run-time installer 8.15 and run the installation. The installer can be obtained by going to https://supportportal.thalesgroup.com/csm?id=portal_home_page and searching for support article KB0018320. Download the 8.15 software from within the support article. After the installation, verify that the software key shows up in device manager without errors.

 

6. Shock6 Software

The Shock6 software has several methods to aid in troubleshooting which will be discussed in the following sections.

6.1 Error Messages

Start the Shock software and attempt to run a normal test. If the motor does not start when the Start Test button is clicked, the program may display an error message. Read the error message carefully. The cause of the failure is usually displayed in the message. Take a screenshot of the error message to reference back to. A few examples are below:

If the motor fails to start at the beginning of the test, an error such as “Motor start failed” may display as seen in Figure 31. This indicates that the communication between the crank dyno and the motor inverter caused the motor not to start moving. Check the motor cable (following the instructions in the Motor Cable section of this guide) and ensure that the motor inverter is powered on by looking for the power indicator on the inverter display.

Figure 31: The “Motor start failed” error window

If the message indicates an “Emergency Stop” error such as Figure 32, check to see if the E-Stop button is depressed. The inverter display will have a flashing letter “E” to indicate it has sensed the E-stop button has been pressed (as seen in Figure 33). To reset the E-stop button turn 1/4 turn (to release button) and pull the button out all the way (the button on newer systems is a twist and pull design requiring pulling out on the button to reset it), then turn off the power to the inverter until the keypad screen goes blank. Turn power back on and it should be ready to test.

Figure 32: The “Emergency stop” error window

Figure 33: The inverter display when an E-stop is pressed. The “E” displayed will blink on and off

If the system was able to move the motor but a timeout error occurred such as Figure 34, this indicates errors with the displacement signal or too small of move tolerances. See the Common Issues section of this document for more information on timeout errors and move tolerances.

Figure 34: A timeout error indicating that the displacement feedback problems

6.2 Motor, Datacard and Software Key Indicators

There are several indicators within Shock6 that tell the status of certain components of the system. The first of these are the Motor and Data card indicators at the bottom right corner of the main screen in the Shock software. The text of both indicators should be black. If the text of an indicator is gray (such as Datacard in Figure 35 or Motor in Figure 36) there is a problem between the software, computer and physical hardware related to the item that is grayed out.

Figure 35: The status bar of Shock6 showing the Datacard status is not good because it is grayed out

Figure 36: The status bar of Shock6 showing the Motor status is not good because it is grayed out

If these indicators are not displayed on the screen, go to the View pull-down menu and select Status Bar (see Figure 37).

Figure 37: The View drop down menu showing the option to enable the status bar

With the Shock6 software open, hovering the mouse over the Shock Security Monitor icon in the windows task bar will display whether the computer recognizes the software key (Figure 38 and Figure 39).

Figure 38: The software key is recognized by the PC and Shock software

Figure 39: The software key is not recognized by the PC and Shock software

The “Test” and “Create” functions in the Shock6 toolbar (and Test drop down menu) are additional status indicators but they provide the same information as the Motor, Datacard and Key indicators. They are mentioned here for completeness but are less direct indicators of the system problem. The status of the Datacard, Motor and software key indicators should be looked to first as they directly point to the potential problem.

Figure 40: The Test icon is grayed out, indicating issues with the motor or datacard

Figure 41: The Create icon is grayed out, indicating issues with the software key

6.3 Possible System States

The possible states of the status indicators and the representative fixes for each system state are as follows:

  • The motor indicator is grayed out (Figure 36) and the Shock Security Monitor notes the key as “present” (Figure 38). This means the Shock6 software is not able to communicate with the motor inverter. This will also manifest itself by the Test button in the Test dropdown selection being grayed out (Figure 40) along with the motor indicator.
    1. Restart the Shock6 software
    2. Verify all cables are connected
    3. Follow all procedures in the Motor Cable section of this guide to troubleshoot motor communication issues
    4. Restart the PC, cycle power to the crank dyno
  • The datacard indicator is grayed out (Figure 35) and the Shock Security Monitor notes the key as “present” (Figure 38). This means the Shock6 software is not able to communicate with the datacard. This will also manifest itself by the Test button in the Test dropdown selection being grayed out (Figure 40) along with the datacard indicator.
    1. Restart the Shock6 software
    2. Verify all cables are connected
    3. Follow the procedure in the Datacard section of this guide to troubleshoot Datacard communication issues
    4. Restart the PC, cycle power to the crank dyno
  • The Shock Security Monitor notes the key as “Missing” (Figure 39) and the Motor and Datacard indicators are solid black text (not grayed out). This indicates that they software key is not present or not recognized by the PC and the software has launched in Demo mode. This will also manifest itself by the Create button in the Test dropdown selection being grayed out (Figure 41).
    1. Insert the software key if it is not plugged into the PC
    2. Restart the Shock6 software
    3. Follow the procedure in the Software Key section of this guide to troubleshoot software key issues
    4. Restart the PC, cycle power to the crank dyno

6.4 Demo Mode

If Shock6 was installed without the software key plugged into the PC, it has been installed in demo mode and will not be able to operate the crank dyno. A similar demo mode can also be entered when opening Shock6 that has been properly installed, but was opened without the software key plugged in. To check if the software is in Demo mode:

  1. Check if the Shock Security Monitor notes the software key as “present” (Figure 38) or “missing” (Figure 39) by hovering over the icon in the windows task bar. If the status is “missing”, it is likely that the software is running in demo mode.
  2. Open the Hardware drop down and select Motor. If the Hardware and Motor selections are grayed out (Figure 42), the software has been opened in demo mode and the software key has not been recognized. Insert the software key and restart the software. Pursue further troubleshooting in the Software Key section of this guide if problems persist.

Figure 42: The Datacard and Motor options of the Hardware menu are grayed out

  1. If the Motor selection window displays “Roehrig Engineering Demo Motor” as seen in Figure 43, the system has been launched in Demo mode.
    1. If there are no other options besides the “Roehrig Engineering Demo Motor” in the motor configuration list, the software likely has been installed in demo mode and needs to be uninstalled and reinstalled, making sure to plug the software key in when prompted during the beginning of the installation.
    2. If there are other options besides the “Roehrig Engineering Demo Motor” in the list such as the standard “Roehrig Engineering VFS-15 Motor Controller”, it indicates that the software may have been installed properly, but currently the software key currently isn’t plugged in or recognized. Try selecting the proper motor configuration and clicking Ok, then attempt to run a test.

Figure 43: The motor configuration window displaying the demo motor selection

  1. Restart the software and attempt this check again.
  2. If, upon restarting the software, the default motor configuration is still the “Roehrig Engineering Demo Motor”, the software key requires troubleshooting (review the Software Key section of this guide) or the software has been installed in demo mode in which case the software must be uninstalled and reinstalled, making sure to plug the software key in when prompted during the installation.  

When attempting to run a test in demo mode, the warning screen shown in Figure 44 will appear indicating the software has been started in demo mode due to the key not being plugged in or the software was only installed with the demo functionality.

Figure 44: The demo datacard warning popup

6.5 Backing up and Restoring Settings

Shock6 settings files are spread out over several different XML files and their contents varies.

  • User settings: Contains information from the Preferences menu as well as Math channels and all test definitions
  • System settings: Contains Motor, Datacard, channel calibrations and various other settings related to control and feedback
  • Math settings: Contains only math channels
  • Test settings: Contains only test definitions which can be exported and imported to other systems

To backup settings files from a system, open Shock6 and click on the Settings dropdown in the top bar (Figure 45). Select the settings you wish to export (User, System, Math, Test) and export them to a location on the computer. Be sure to include a date and a good description of the file. Note that the “Export all settings” selection does not create Math and Test settings files but the content is included in the User settings which is exported.

Figure 45: The Settings dropdown menu in Shock6

In the case that Shock6 can’t start because of an error of some other issue, the User settings can be located in “C:\Users\USERNAME\AppData\Roaming\Roehrig\Shock.xml”. The System settings file can be located in “C:\ProgramData\Roehrig\Hardware\SOMENAME.xml”. Note that the AppData and ProgramData folders are both “hidden” folders. To view them, the windows file explorer view options must be set to show hidden files, folders and drives (Figure 46). Copy both of these files to a known location to back them up. There aren’t separate files for the Math and Test settings as they reside within the User settings file.

Figure 46: The Folder Options window to set folder view options

To revert to previously backed up files simply select the Settings dropdown, click on the appropriate settings selection and select Import. Point the software to the backup file.

6.6 Basic Uninstall and Reinstall Instructions

To uninstall and reinstall the software follow the basic procedure below:

  1. Backup all shock6 settings to avoid losing calibration data, created tests, custom system setup and any other special settings.
  2. Before uninstalling the software, ensure the installer is available.
  3. Open the control panel in Windows, locate the Shock6 software and click Uninstall.
  4. After uninstallation, reboot the computer.
  5. Unplug the USB to serial converter from the computer.
  6. Unplug the USB connection to the datacard.
  7. Locate the Shock6 installer and run it.
  8. When prompted, plug in the software key and leave it plugged in during the software installation.
  9. After the installation has completed, restart the computer.
  10. Open the Shock6 software.
  11. Verify that the tests from before the uninstall are still present. If so, there is no need to import the user settings file as it was not deleted during the uninstall process.
  12. Verify that the datacard channels are all still present and verify that the calibrations are valid. If so, there is no need to import the system settings file as it was not deleted during the uninstall process.

7. Windows Settings

7.1 USB Power Management – turn off power saving in device manager

Adjust the power management settings for the USB Root Hub in the device manager. Right click on the USB Root Hub in the device manager and select Properties. Navigate to the Power Management tab and uncheck the option “allow computer to turn off this device to save power” as seen in Figure 47.

Figure 47: The power management settings of the USB Root Hub

7.2 Windows Power Options

Navigate to the advanced power options within windows. Disable settings that allow USB ports to suspend or sleep, as well as settings for system sleep, hibernation, monitor sleep and hard drive suspend. These options (especially the USB settings) may interrupt dyno operation.

8. Common Issues

Motor starts but runs continuously. If aborted, Shock6 may show a timeout error unknown test error

  • The displacement channel reading may be incorrect or unchanging. The most common problem is the power cord for the power supply to the electronics board coming unplugged over time. Remove the rear cover of the crank dyno and verify that the power cord is plugged into the power supply feeding the electronics board (see Figure 48).

Figure 48: The rear of a 2VS crank dyno with the rear cover removed

  • Verify that the displacement and velocity sensor connector is firmly connected to the electronics board on the back of the dyno (see Figure 49).

Figure 49: The electronics board with its various connections annotated

  • Check the power supply voltage output by disconnecting the 9 pin D-sub connector to the electronics board. The voltage on the cable coming from the power supply should be 12 volts between pins 2 and 8, -12 volts between pins 4 and 8, and 24 volts between pins 2 and 4. If any of these voltages are 0 or incorrect, the power supply may be faulty and requires replacement.
  • The cabling to the displacement sensor may be loose, frayed or disconnected. Remove the front cover of the crank dyno and verify that the screw in the center of the DIN connector on the displacement transducer is tight and that the body and rod end of the displacement sensor are properly mounted to the system (see Figure 50).

Figure 50: The front of a 2VS crank dyno with the front cover removed

The actuator is unable to stop near BDC or at gas test locations and a timeout error may occur

  • The dyno may time out when trying to move to BDC or gas test locations if the displacement sensor is unable to achieve a displacement value within a specified tolerance band. This may indicate that the motor is moving too quickly during movements or that the acceptable tolerance may be too small. In Shock6 select the Hardware dropdown from the top bar and select Motor (Figure 22). Click Yes at the warning window to continue to the next window (Figure 23). Select the Configure button on the appropriate motor configuration for the system (Figure 24). The motor properties window will appear (Figure 25). In this window make sure the move control tolerance is set at a minimum of 6% or more and the Default BDC Frequency is 0.11 Hz or below. Click Ok through all windows to return to the main Shock6 screen. Retry the problematic test again after these changes.

Certain graphs are flat lines, very noisy or do not correlate to what the expected data should be

  • Each data channel collected must be checked individually (Force, Displacement, Velocity and Temperature) to determine where the problem exists.
  • Click the Graph dropdown on the top bar and select Signals vs Time (or hit the F7 key on the keyboard). Select the signal(s) to view such as Force, Displacement, Velocity and Temperature and click Ok. Look at each signal individually and compare the output to what the expected output should be.
  • Data is a flat line: Inspect the dyno for damaged or disconnected sensor wires. A cable to or from the sensor, electronics board or datacard may be loose or disconnected. The power supply to the electronics board may be faulty and not supplying voltage.
  • Data contains lots of noise: Other equipment nearby or on the same circuit may be causing noise. Turn off other equipment nearby and try the tests again. The DIN connector on the displacement sensor may be loose. The cable connection at the electronics board may be loose. The connection from the electronics board to the datacard may be loose.
  • For the displacement signal, verify that the amplitude of the displacement data matches the amplitude that the crank is set to.
  • For the temperature sensor, check the real time readout on the Test screen with a warm object such as your hand in front of the temperature sensor as well as at room temperature without any object in front of the sensor.
  • For the load cell, check the real time readout on the Test screen by pushing and pulling on the load cell to verify that the loading is approximately in the correct order of magnitude. Check the cable from the load cell to the electronics board.
  • If the velocity and displacement channel are flat lines, the d-sub connector connecting the sensor wires to the electronics board may be disconnected. Remove the rear cover and check the connectors at the bottom of the electronics board (see Figure 49).
  • If all channels show a flat line the power supply to the electronics board may not be plugged in or is defective (see Figure 48). Check that it is plugged in and test the output voltage of the power supply if necessary.

Force channel signal is missing or incorrect

  • Disconnect the cable at the load cell and measure the voltage across pins A and D. It should read 10 volts for newer systems and 15 volts for older systems. If there is no voltage measured across pins A and D, verify that the crank dyno is plugged in and that the circuit it is connected to is turned on. The power cord to the signal conditioner board at the bank of the crank dyno may be unplugged or non-functional.

Figure 51: The load cell cable connection, noting pins A and D which bring excitation voltage to the load cell (either 10v or 15v depending on the system)

  • On the Test screen, Go to the Hardware dropdown and select Monitor, then select integers. View the force channel (remove any shock or load from the load cell) and check that the integers correspond appropriately as you push and pull on the load cell.  Also make sure the force channel does not have a major offset at zero load (an indication that the load cell has been damaged).  If channel is not responding check that the load cell cable connections are tight at the load cell and the electronics board and that the cable does not look damaged (kinked, frayed, cut, etc.).

The motor sounds like it is spinning but there is no actuator motion

  • One of two belts on the system have broken. Remove the rear cover and inspect the rear belt and replace as necessary. If the rear belt is still intact, remove the upper cover of the system to view the inner belt in the center of the system and replace as necessary.

The dyno runs but will skip or pause periodically

  • One of the two belts on the system has stripped teeth. Remove the rear cover of the system and inspect the rear belt for stripped teeth and replace as necessary. If the rear belt is in good condition, remove the upper cover of the system to view the inner belt and inspect it for missing teeth and replace as necessary.

The Measure Stroke function failed

  • The displacement signal is not able to be read by the Shock6 software. The displacement sensor may be unplugged, the cabling from the sensor to the electronics board may be disconnected, the electronics board may not be getting power from the power supply, the datacard may not be connected to the electronics board or the electronics board may be faulty.

Stroke Measurement doesn’t correspond with crank displacement setting

  • Loose cabling, possibly at the bottom of the displacement sensor (linear potentiometer). Tighten the screw in the center of the DIN connector at the bottom of the displacement sensor.
  • If measure stroke displays one value that is incorrect but displays the same value repeatedly, the displacement calibration may be incorrect and requires calibration

Motor Speed is Incorrect – Check Velocity Sensor Calibration

  • The velocity sensor calibration should be checked against a derived velocity using the displacement sensor. Note that this will require the displacement sensor calibration to be correct in order to perform this check.
    1. In the Edit menu select Preferences (or press F12)
    2. Select the Math Signals tab, and within, select the Formula tab
    3. Insert a channel
    4. Change the channel name to something like DerVel to indicate it is derived velocity
    5. Change the units to the appropriate velocity units for the system
    6. In the Formula window enter: -DIFF(Displacement)
    7. Click Ok to exit the Math Channel window
    8. Click Ok to exit the Shock Preferences window
    9. Run a test on the system and note what velocity the actuator peaks should achieve based on the entered test parameters (frequency, amplitude)
    10. View the Signals vs Time graphs (in the Graph dropdown select Signals vs. Time) and select the DerVel channel and the Velocity channel. Compare the peak values of the two to determine if the derived velocity based on the displacement sensor approximately matches the output of the velocity sensor. If these values are very different, the velocity sensor requires calibration.

Estop error or have an E flashing on the inverter display

  • The E-stop is pushed down. Twist and pull the estop to reset the button, then unplug the crank dyno and wait until the inverter display goes dark. Plug the inverter back in and the system should be ready to run. The software may need to be restarted.

Motor indicator grayed out after changing USB ports with USB to Serial converter

  • The COM port in the windows device manager has likely changed when the USB port used by the USB to serial converter is changed. Always reconnect the USB to Serial converter to the same USB port to ensure the COM port assigned to it does not change. If changing USB ports frequently, always log into the windows device manager to the change the assigned COM port to the proper port used by Shock6.

End of Troubleshooting Guide 

If your problem persists after following this document, please contact MTS Service for repair options.   Call toll free 1-800-328-2255 or email tech.support@mts.com.

 

 

C
Chad is the author of this solution article.

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